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Ressenyes poc realistes i Fotos d’iOS

Les ressenyes d’aplicacions haurien de tenir obligatòriament un apartat que es titulés “Siguem realistes”, sempre, i Fotos d’iOS se’n mereixeria un de gran. El que passa en iOS, operant en Fotos, és el següent:

– Els usuaris no poden assignar etiquetes a les fotografies i veure les que ja tiguin assignades.
– És impossible saber les dimensions d’una fotografia (tret que s’utilitzi un procés de l’aplicacó Workflow, que no és cap justificació).
– Quan es visualitza un àlbum, els usuaris no poden assignar fotografies a altres àlbums. En general, organitzar fotografies en iOS és gairebé impossible.
– El procés de pujada de les fotografies a iCloud i d’actualització en tots els dispositius és ridículament lent.

    Hi insisteixo: les ressenyes poc realistes desorienten els usuaris actuals i potencials. El sentit crític forma part d’una aproximació assenyada a qualsevol aplicació que s’estigui revisant o analitzant.

    PD (28 agost 2016): M’he equivocat en el tercer punt. En un àlbum, sí que es pot assignar una fotografia a un altre àlbum.

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    PDF management across devices

    I’ve recently talked about PDF workflows in this threat, where someone asked for feedback about using Papers 3 and Devon Think Pro. I cannot bring up anything about Devon Think, which I haven’t used, but someone did, and it turns out both applications complement each other satisfactorily.

    I’ve already reviewed Papers 3 here (in Catalan). I commented on my experience with it and explained why I dropped it. Needless to say, my personal experience is nothing more than a single testimony. Anyway, I kept looking for a solution I can adopt and it turns out I may have found it. It’s called EagleFiler and I plan to use it in conjunction with Goodreader, that is to say, I will place my libraries in the Goodreader folder in iCloud Drive, so that I can access all the documents stored in them from every Apple device.

    EagleFiler-finestra

    Prior to any other consideration, there’s the issue with iCloud Drive and some folders not showing up in it, which is something that happened to me. The solution has been to completely sign out from iCloud (only in the main machine, in my case), then restarting the computer and eventually signing in again. Once the Goodreader folder on place, trying EagleFiler has proven to be easy. The big inconvenience is that the main Photos library has to be uploaded to the cloud from scratch.

    With EagleFiler, I can create different libraries. In Goodreader on the iPad, I see those libraries on the iCloud folder. The iCloud syncing process isn’t fast, not even close. However, as iCloud Drive files get backed up on the iMac and the MacBook Pro, I feel save. Moreover, with a €0.99 cents fee per month, I can store up to 50GB in it. EagleFiler picks the PDF metadata and Finder tags already assigned to files. Consequently, the best practice is to apply tags to files and fill in the PDF metadata (I use PDFpen for that) prior to adding any file to the EagleFiler library of choice.

    One of the most valuable features of EagleFiler, in my humble opinion, is that its libraries are an open format. In order to guarantee data integrity, documents are not processed. They are stored as-is. That’s exactly what I needed. In general, EagleFiler’s interface and the integration with Goodreader may not make the ideal environment to most people. To me, they do.

    Summing up, I encourage anyone in need of a good workflow to deal with PDFs to look at these two applications. Give them a try. Why not?

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